Vespertine Hour

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"To my own ear, I sound hyperpoetic, and I don't mean to exaggerate these vespertine moods; I think that this restlessness that I am describing was really quite ordinary." ~Peter Gadol, The Long Rain

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Reblogged from micdotcom
The world’s 85 richest people have as much wealth as the world’s 3.5 billion poorest. This statistic was recently released in United Nations report that uses Oxfam figures. It’s also a huge wake-up call for anyone who doesn’t consider income inequality a major issue in global politics. (via micdotcom)

(via alwaysbeyondhope)

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Reblogged from epic-vines

royalblackpirate:

epic-vines:

When tree branches get in my way

Vine by: Logan Paul

How we manage to cram such genius in 6 seconds is beyond me. This is art.

(via feelthefallskeepfalling)

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Reblogged from discuntinq

spoopdogg:

seventoinfinity:

discuntinq:

Using y = mx + b to measure the slope of that ass

Mathematically incorrect. Unless the ass was linear, but that’s biologically incorrect. You’d probably wanna use something like y=ax^2+bx+c because the ass is a second degree polynomial curve. 

did you major in booty math

(via feelthefallskeepfalling)

maidenmothercronus:

inconvenientlylargelizard:

HOW TO CHEER UP IN 2 EASY STEPS

  1. WHISPER “BEEP BOOP” TO YOURSELF.
  2. REPEAT UNTIL NOT SAD.

((BUT WHY DOES THIS WORK??????))

(via feelthefallskeepfalling)

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Reblogged from aseaofquotes
docsorrow:

aseaofquotes:

— Mary MacLane
Submitted by litafficionado.

literally same

docsorrow:

aseaofquotes:

— Mary MacLane

Submitted by .

literally same

(via katiereallylovesthings)

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

humansofnewyork:

“We fled to the Philippines, which was under American occupation at the time. But it wasn’t long before the Japanese took over the islands. We were living in Manila, and when the Japanese occupied the city, they began to teach us to read and write Japanese. When the Americans came to retake the city, they invaded from the north, and the Japanese blew up the bridges and barricaded themselves in the southern part of the city where we lived. Shells were falling all around us, because the Japanese had stationed a gun encampment across from our house. One morning, we decided to make a run for the hospital, so that we could put ourselves under the protection of the Red Cross. Our neighbors were running in front of us, pushing their belongings on a pushcart, when they stepped on a land mine and the whole family was killed. We kept running, but when we got to the main street, there was a checkpoint and we weren’t allowed to cross. So we hid beneath a house, and soon we were discovered by Japanese soldiers. They lined us all up against the wall to be executed. We begged and begged and begged for our lives. They finally allowed my mother and the children to step aside, but they told my father to stay. My mother dropped to her knees and asked the Japanese commander to imagine it was his family. And he finally let all of us go.”

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Reblogged from visual-poetry
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Reblogged from bisoukawaii

Trey Parker and Matt Stone on acid at the Oscars, 2000.

»We said, We can’t say anything about them. Nothing about the dresses. No matter what they ask us. So everyone would go, Guys, what about the dresses? Why the dresses? And we’d go, Magical night tonight. Just, all the stars are out! […] I also remember, actually, then having to sit there in the actual Oscars, and you’re coming down off the acid. So you’re simultaneously coming down, and you’re having to now sit through the Oscars, which sucks. There were people there that were like, Dude, this is my big night. Fuck you. It was the funniest thing to us.«

(Source: bisoukawaii, via feelthefallskeepfalling)

OH MY GOD I’M A BEAR

OH MY GOD I’M A BEAR